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Posted by on Sep 14, 2015 |

Next generation library system project launches October 2015

Next generation library system project launches October 2015

The 23-campus California State University system will launch a two-year migration project on October 5, 2015 with Ex Libris, an industry leader in integrated, next-generation shared library systems.

The CSU system currently uses a variety of library systems to manage their collections, support discovery of digital resources, and provide the back-end services that are needed to acquire resources on behalf of thousands of faculty and nearly 500,000 students.

By June 2017, all 23 campuses will be using a common platform – Ex Libris Alma, together with Ex Libris resource discovery system, Primo. In addition to increased efficiency and equity, this means that students and faculty will have easier access to the materials they need for their research and scholarship.

The Council of Library Deans (COLD) voted in October 2014 to adopt a unified library management system, and worked closely with Gerry Hanley, CSU’s Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Technology Services, to develop the RFP and ultimately select Ex Libris.

“This process has been visionary and transformational for COLD,” said Dean of Library and Information Access and COLD Chair Dr. Gale Etschmaier. “The ULMS project and our work together to make this vision a reality will change how the CSU libraries will work together to serve our diverse campuses and students.”

Vanguard Campus Pilots

A team of experienced library systems engineers and project managers at the Chancellor’s Office will support the data and workflow migrations. In addition, campus project leaders and functional experts will guide implementation through two major phases: a “Vanguard Campus” phase in which Fresno, Northridge, and San Jose, three of the larger campuses, will create a test environment to explore capabilities and configurations.

Single Wave Migration in 2017

The second phase of migration will begin in March 2016. Based on consultations with other libraries that have implemented a shared system, the CSU and Ex Libris have agreed to a single wave migration plan in which all campuses will migrate to the Ex Libris platform together in spring 2017. This option means a lengthier training and testing timeline than would have been possible otherwise.

Partners in Development

The system-wide project includes opportunities to develop Alma’s user interface, workflows, accessibility and ADA compliance. Ex Libris will also provide usage data for electronic resources via COUNTER reports in Alma Analytics by the end of 2017.

Project Updates

The Chancellor’s Office is leading the migration project. Brandon Dudley is the ULMS project director who is working in close collaboration with David Walker, the Director of Systemwide Digital Library Services. Project updates and details can be found on the project website: ulms.calstate.edu.

Previous stories about the ULMS project:

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Posted by on Jan 7, 2015 | 2 comments

Equitable Access, Public Stewardship, and Access to Scholarly Information

Equitable Access, Public Stewardship, and Access to Scholarly Information

The following is a statement of the California State University Council of Library Deans:

The twenty-three libraries serving nearly 500,000 students and scholars at California State University’s diverse campuses are firmly committed to their mission of providing equitable access to academic and professional information resources to every student and scholar.  We are equally committed to the principle of responsible stewardship of the public funds entrusted to us to meet our mission of service to these students and scholars.

It is therefore with deep regret that we share the news with our colleagues and the students and faculty we serve, that on December 19, 2014, we made the decision not to continue, as a system, to provide system-wide access to a collection of over 1300 electronic journals published by a major publisher of scholarly and professional journals, John Wiley and Company.

We were unable to reach an agreement with Wiley and Company that met our fundamental goal of providing equitable access to information across all 23 campuses.  The terms offered to the CSU by Wiley and Company would have cost more than many of our campuses could afford.  This meant that several campuses would be forced to cancel their subscriptions, and that these campuses’ share of the total package costs would be remanded to other campuses. This was not acceptable to us.

As well, we were unable to reach an agreement with Wiley that met our responsibility for careful stewardship of limited public funds.  The terms offered by Wiley and Company would have meant a cost increase of 10-12% across the CSU system: nearly double the average reported 2014 journal inflation rates reported by Library Journal in 2014. While Wiley and Company offered access to additional content as part of their terms, the CSU libraries did not find the value of the additional content compelling.  Our records showed that most of this additional content was unneeded and seldom-consulted.

The CSU libraries offered to maintain their system-wide license with a smaller package of several hundred electronic journals that would have met both these core principles: equitable access, and responsible stewardship.  This offer was rejected by Wiley and Company.

While we were unable to reach an agreement with Wiley and Company to implement this smaller package license at this time, we remain hopeful that we can reach agreement with Wiley and Company by or before January 2016 to license a smaller number of journals that have been determined to be of the most importance to students and scholars in the CSU system, based on data analysis and close consultation with CSU faculty and scholars.

The CSU is not the first university library system that has chosen to reduce the number of low-use journal subscriptions provided to their students and scholars through “big deal” journal packages.

Others have also chosen this path, and in the process retained access to journals where the need is greater, while also retaining the flexibility to add or remove titles based on the scholarly needs of their campuses.

Among the universities that have adopted this strategy are Harvard University; the University of Minnesota; the University of Oregon; Oregon State University; Southern Illinois University at Carbondale; California Institute of Technology; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Purdue University; and University of Kansas (Bergstrom et al. 2014; Nable and Fowler, 2011).

The CSU libraries network will be working closely with one another throughout 2015 to support every campus in its transition.  We remain committed to working together to provide the highest quality information resources to all our students and faculty, at a reasonable price. Each campus library is also developing an interim strategy to best support the needs of their campus in 2015.

The CSU libraries understand that all scholars and faculty, as well as students and academic leaders, have crucial roles to play both as producers and consumers of scholarly information.  Their research, advocacy, and initiative are vital in seeking and supporting sustainable paths for scholarly publishing that do not result in a world of scholarly haves and have-nots; and that do not result in their libraries spending scarce public resources on products that do not benefit their students and faculty.

For more information about the costs to libraries of scholarly publications: Library Journal, Periodicals Price Survey, 2014

For more information about “big deal” journal bundling:

Association of Research Libraries (ARL), Karla Streib and Julia Blixrud. The State of Large-Publisher Bundles in 2012.

Bergstrom, Theodore et al. “Evaluating Big Deal Journal Bundles” (2014), PNAS v. 111, n. 26, pp. 9425-9430.

Nabe, Jonathan and David Fowler, “Leaving the Big Deal:  Consequences and Next Steps” (2011).  Conference Papers and Presentations, Paper 14.

Campus statements:

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Posted by on Oct 15, 2014 | 4 comments

Council of Library Deans supports goals of historic state legislation

Council of Library Deans supports goals of historic state legislation

(Updated) The 23 libraries of the California State University system are committed to providing all students and faculty equitable access to quality research and information.

California is the first state to pass legislation to ensure that publicly funded research is made available to the public. California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Legislation (A.B. 609) was signed into law on September 29, 2014, by Governor Jerry Brown. This new law requires public access to research funded by the California Department of Public Health within 12 months of initial publication. This way, doctors, patients, researchers, educators, students, entrepreneurs, and others can benefit from the research.

Mark Stover, dean of the Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge, is enthusiastic about this legislation. “Research that is funded by the government should not be held behind a paywall that is erected by commercial publishers and scientific organizations. The state of California should not pay twice for research. Instead, this research, when published in peer reviewed journals, should be made available free of charge to the general public, but particularly to students and faculty in state institutions like the CSU. A.B. 609 is one small but important step in this direction.”

Supporting open access requirements

The libraries of the California State University actively support the goals of this historic legislation by providing CSU scholars with services that support the open access requirements of state, federal, and other research funding agencies.

For example, seventeen of the CSU’s 23 libraries provide digital archives for faculty and student scholarly works; many of these archives are powered by CSU’s ScholarWorks service, hosted by the Chancellor’s Office.

Librarians with expertise in scholarly publishing also support open access by consulting with campus faculty on their publishing choices. Faculty can enhance the impact of their research by publishing in peer-reviewed open access journals.

Resolution on the passage of A.B. 609

In addition to providing services to support open access, the Council of Library Deans passed a resolution to support A.B. 609 on October 22, 2014:

Whereas: The libraries of the California State University (CSU) are committed to providing equitable access to quality research and information, for all students and faculty of the CSU, at all 23 CSU campuses;

Whereas: A.B. 609, “California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Legislation,” signed into law on September 29, 2014 by Governor Jerry Brown, requires that public access be provided to research funded by the California Department of Public Health, within 12 months of initial publication;

Whereas: The state of California is the first state to pass legislation to ensure than research funded by the public is made available to doctors, patients, researchers, educators, students, entrepreneurs, and other individuals who can benefit from access to the results of research;

Whereas: Support for A.B. 609 was bipartisan and included the University of California and many influential California voices in education, research, the technology industry, and public policy organizations;

Therefore be it resolved: The Council of Library Deans (COLD) of the California State University supports the goal of this historic legislation, to expand public access to research funded by the state of California.

Just in time for Open Access Week

“California’s landmark legislation and our resolution are just in time as we celebrate Open Access Week 2014 from October 20-26,” said Anna Gold, chair of the Council of Library Deans. “Open Access, together with Affordable Learning Solutions, makes current research and knowledge accessible to all our citizens and students.”

Support for A.B. 609 was bipartisan, and included the University of California and many influential California voices in education, research, the technology industry, and public policy organizations.

Read the press release at Cal Poly News.

CSU Libraries Digital Scholarship Archives

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